The Agrarian Sharing Network (ASN) is a decentralized, collaborative network, focused on distributing plant diversity to friends and neighbors and creating a shareable reproducible model for others to implement.
It’s as much about the plants as it is about the people.


seed@agrariansharing.net


2023 marked the launch of the ASN Seed Increase Initiative. Already, by mid-summer, our volunteer growers have seed increases on isolated populations of several key summer crop types (tomatoes, corn, beans, amaranth, quinoa and various Cucurbit species) well in hand. We’ will’ll provide further updates as summer turns to fall. Toward the end of the year, we hope to host a winter seed exchange allowing us to meet up and begin sharing the fruits of our seed-increase labors with one another

We have had much longer to prepare for seed increases throughout the winter season, however, and the opportunity it provides to focus increase efforts on seed crops which require a period of vernalization (a period of prolonged winter cold to induce flowering). The great majority of our mainstay Brassica crops (kales and cabbages and so forth) require vernalization to produce seed. The winter season therefore represents a crucial period in our larger efforts to secure a regenerative local food system.

We have already begun distributing seed for over-wintered crops to potential growers and we will also be raising transplants for growers, too. Already this year, we have learned that providing transplants ready-to-go, from our nursery in Cottage Grove, OR, is proving to be a very attractive option for growers.

For those of you curious in raising winter crops for eating or seed, here’s a calendar providing a simple introduction to timing on the broad but common array of crop types we raise through winter. Do any of these crops appeal to you as a seed increase project?

Crops we are currently seeking support for seed increases on, include field crops such as:

European Kales
Russo-Siberian Kales
Collards
Fall Broccoli
Over-wintering Broccoli
Overwintering Cauliflower
Fall Cabbage
Overwintering Cabbage
Brussels Sprouts
Kohlrabi
Rutabaga
Beets
Carrots
Parsley
Parsnip
Spinach
Chard


And a broad array of greenhouse crops including extensive diversity within the following:


Mizuna
Choi
Assorted Asian greens
Arugula
Mizspoona


ASNSII Winter transplants mid-July 2023:

CropSpeciesVarietyBasic varietal and cultural informationSourceSeeding dateSeed packetGerm.
Kale – Ruso-SiberianB. napusRuso-Siberian Mix‘Red Russian’ and ‘Siberian’ are the best known of this Brassica napus kale-type, and are the progenitors of this mix which originated as a cross by Frank Morton at Wild Garden Seeds, ca. 1984, birthing a genetic gold mine of a dizzying array of shapes and hues. Works best for mid-June-Aug sowing, aimed at fall-through-winter cropping in milder climates, producing copious leaves and, in the spring, 'napini' (flowering bud shoots). More tender and with less 'bite' than the European kales (B. oleraceae), it is also a preferred kale species for raw-salad use, and spring 'napini'. Hardy to 10ºF. This beautifully diverse population is perfect material for farmers and homesteaders wishing to select strains adaptable to their own farm environment. Every location we've seen this population introduced, it has become a winter standard. Ruso-Siberian kales (B. napus) will cross with Rutabagas (also B. napus) but not with (B. oleraceae) European kales.Wild Garden Seeds7/1/20232022
Kale – Ruso-SiberianB. napusSimone BroadleafThis variety is bred by Adaptive Seeds, "Our second release coming out of the Gulag Stars kale population. Simone Broadleaf has a strong thematic character containing all tasty broadleaf plants of various colors and leaf edge waves. Some plants are dark green and glazed, others are light green and silvery, while still others are tinged with purple or shades of red. If you are looking for a kale that is a breeze to process in the kitchen and/or a kale that is a beast in the garden, Simone Broadleaf is for you. This participatory breeding project is inspired by the Culinary Breeding Network and we are happy to have been working with Lane Selman and chef Tim Wastell. We separated out 15 single plant lines of Gulag Stars kale and discovered several monster lines that were shockingly vigorous. After several collaborative selections, we bulked the biggest and best plants into a variable population. Tim Wastell coined the name and we have kept it to honor all the great Simones out there, from Simone de Beauvoir to Nina Simone." This accession, unusually, appears to bolt later than other kales. A very useful trait in the mid-late spring 'hunger gap season.' Ruso-Siberian kales (B. napus) will cross with Rutabagas (also B. napus) but not with European kales (B. oleraceae).Adaptive7/1/20232021
RutabagaB. napusJoanRutabagas (B. napus will cross with Ruso-Siberian kales but not with most other Brassicas (B. oleraceae) in the winter garden. A popular variety of a major winter staple. Rutabagas are extremely nutrient dense and hardy, faster _throughout_ winters than most other crops. Ruso-Siberian kales present the only practical cross-pollination challenge. So, effectively, one of the easiest, cornerstone winter Brassicas to save seed on.Wild Garden Seeds7/1/20232017
CabbageB. oleraceaeFilderkrautSeed from Uprising who call it, "Hands down our favorite cabbage. We searched for seed after first seeing it at the Slow Food “Salone del Gusto” food fair held in Torino, Italy in 2006 where its unusual conical shape and sweet flavor made a lasting impression. And I’m not talking about “egghead” conical; Filder is a cartoonish gnome hat extreme reaching sizes of a foot wide and two feet tall. Named for the region it hails from, near Stuttgart in southern Germany, it is traditionally a sauerkraut cabbage and in our opinion the very best there is. Written records of the variety date back to the 1700’s but with the mechanization of the kraut industry in the mid 20th century, it fell out of favor due to its awkward shape for mechanical processing. Having maintained a regional following, it was boarded on Germany’s Slow Food Ark of Taste, and has since then found a wider audience. A long season, fall cropper it can reach huge sizes (10+ lbs), with a single cabbage filling a 3-gallon crock for us last year. And please, it shouldn’t just be thought of as a processing cabbage. It is hands down the best tasting, sweetest cultivar we’ve tried with none of the sulfur-y pungency that mars many of the modern varieties available, and is a good medium-term storage head to boot. This is one of the varieties that we feel like is at the core of our seed work. Strongly recommended, especially for fermenting enthusiasts." Typically, for seed-saving, professionals seed cabbage (especially the fall-maturing types) later in the season, so that plants go through the winter without fully formed heads and therefore have a much greater likelihood of survival in the face of harsh winter conditions. They will flower and set seed in the new year regardless. But for seedsaving at the homestead level, we like folk to be able to eat their 'rogues' – the plants they select out or 'cull' as off-types. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthUprising6/16/20232023
CabbageB. oleraceaeGlory of EnkhuizenWe 'classify' cabbages as fall, mid- and late-winter varieties, as much dependent on their hardiness as maturity spectrum. Glory of Enkhuizen has very recently established itself as a mid-winter mainstay for us, after many years of disappointing experiences into the wet, cold, difficult winter conditions of the maritime PNW. The seed is well-stewarded; this accession is stable and uniform. 90 days. Introduced in 1899 by Sluis & Groot in Enkhuizen, Holland. Medium-large, hard, round heads. An excellent-keeping variety that is a good producer and good for kraut. A strong candidate for successful overwintering in the field for seed production without additional protection, We'll find out! Typically, for seed-saving, professionals seed cabbage (especially the fall-maturing types) later in the season, so that plants go through the winter without fully formed heads and therefore have a much greater likelihood of survival in the face of harsh winter conditions. They will flower and set seed in the new year regardless. But for seedsaving at the homestead level, we like folk to be able to eat their 'rogues' – the plants they select out or 'cull' as off-types. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthBaker Creek6/17/20232023
CabbageB. oleraceaeJanuary KingReigns supreme among overwintering cabbages. Beautiful purplish plants form light green winter savoy type heads with purple outer leaves on firm, semi-flat, well-filled, 3-5 lb heads from January into March. Our selection from Adaptive seeds who trialed several strains before settling in on a West Coast Seeds selection. Excellent vigor and uniformity. Here's what the cabbage looked like in March of 2023, having overwintered. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthAdaptive7/1/20232023
CabbageB. oleraceaeKalibosStunningly beautiful. Vivid, deep purple and conical with wide, round hips. Best as a fall cabbage – October and November harvest. We first grew this neon, psychedelic, purple-pointed, Belarusian, heirloom cabbage positively some 15-20 years ago, sourcing the material directly out of Europe. Sourcing seed from Baker Creek last year, and raising it into last fall, it was patently clear the cultivar has lost its way, requiring reselection for size, strong cone shape, tight heads, for large head to leaf ratio, and rich color. An excellent project for a farmer curious in supporting what is generally regarded as one of the most striking cabbage varieties ever developed. More details from Fruition Seeds in NY who first restored this variety in the 2010's. Here's what a great specimen looked like in December 2022 . Typically, for seed-saving, professionals seed cabbage (especially the fall-maturing types) later in the season, so that plants go through the winter without fully formed heads and therefore have a much greater likelihood of survival in the face of harsh winter conditions. They will flower and set seed in the new year regardless. But for seedsaving at the homestead level, we like folk to be able to eat their 'rogues' – the plants they select out or 'cull' as off-types. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthBaker Creek6/16/20232023
CabbageB. oleraceaeVerza oretta di Veronella150 days. Seed is from Italy but our source is Uprising. The "Moretta" cabbage is a traditional winter harvested savoy cabbage from the village of Veronella which lies between Verona and Padua in northern Italy. Like many regional specialties with roots in place in Italy and elsewhere, this variety is woven into the agricultural, cullinary, and cultural fabric of the area, and is celebrated with a "Sagra" or harvest festival in the second half of November each year. Green savoyed leaves blush deep purple on the exterior as the weather cools while the interior remains blanched pale yellow. Excellent and cold hardy for winter harvest from June sowing. We've never grown it before. We're curious how it will hold in the field. Typically, for seed-saving, professionals seed cabbage (especially the fall-maturing types) later in the season, so that plants go through the winter without fully formed heads and therefore have a much greater likelihood of survival in the face of harsh winter conditions. They will flower and set seed in the new year regardless. But for seedsaving at the homestead level, we like folk to be able to eat their 'rogues' – the plants they select out or 'cull' as off-types. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthUprising6/16/2023202399%
CollardB. oleraceaeCascade GlazeA Pacific Northwest resurrection of the nearly 200 year old southern, wavy leafed classic “Green Glaze”, brought back to life by the collaborative breeding efforts of Alan Kapular, Carol Deppe, and Jeff McCormac. It expresses an uncommon recessive gene for a waxy, glossy leaf texture (think chard) which is said to deter cabbage worms. Top-notch flavor and very sweet leaf stems with much improved cold tolerance over its southern original. The reselection still contains slight variability in expressing the “glossy” trait with a small percentage of regular leaf plants. An essential fixture in the gardens of those who are familiar with it, but otherwise rare. Less vigorous than most collards – perhaps a correlation with the glaze gene. A variety which thrives under active stewardship of sizeable populations.Uprising6/17/2023202393%
CollardB. oleraceaeChampionChampion was the workhorse standard for collards in the era before F1 hybrids dominated catalogs and, in Nick's opinion, is consistently the most productive leaf-Brassica cultivar in PNW winter cropping systems. Derived from the original Vates strain for being darker blue-green, longer standing, and higher yielding. A copious producer of seed, too. Strangely under-utilized.Wild Garden Seeds6/17/2023202397%
CollardB. oleraceaeMorris HeadingAlready a proven performer in PNW winter gardens, sometimes called 'cabbage collards' by old timers because it makes loose heads that are dark green and slow bolting. Productive, hardy and relatively disease-resistant.Everwilde6/17/2023202390%
CollardB. oleraceaeSurvivor CollardsSurvivor' Collards. A natural selection of huge, majestic plants with a tendency to perennialize, this population is selected for temperature extremes, surviving a -10 degrees C weather event. First showing its face in a seed-saver's garden in Eugene, OR, in 2013, this 'serendipitous' result of a home-gardener's deliberate efforts to steward a locally-adapting collard population through time, birthed this uniquely different population-personality. Extraordinary vigor and resilience on highly productive, resilient plants. Select strains that work best for your growing environment. The seed for this population was passed to Nick by Ruth, an elder, and his 'first gardening student', upon her death-bed. This year's transplants started from 2013 seed, still vigorous in the flats.Ruth7/1/20232013
CollardB. oleraceaeUtopian UltracrossIn 2020 The Utopian Seed Project (Asheville, NC) along with 8 other trial sites (including Southern Exposure Seed Exchange [SESE]) grew 20 collard varieties as part of a nationwide collard trial for The Heirloom Collard Project. The Utopian Seed Project also grew "Lottie" Collard bringing the heirloom total to 21. During the winter of 2020 the collards survived lows of 8°F and in spring/summer 2021 seeds were saved from the surviving plants. Given the obligate outcrossing nature of Brassica oleracea and the randomized two block design of the trial, we can be assured that there was a high degree of inter-variety cross pollination. These seeds represent massive genetic diversity, firstly because the original heirloom collards are genetically diverse, and secondly because they’ve cross pollinated with each other. Collard grower and Heirloom Collard participant, Melony Edwards, described them as an ultracross: this is not a technical term, but captures the spirit of these collards! Enough said.Southern Exposure6/17/2023202385%
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeDazzling BlueA Lacinato/Dino/Italian type kale that really lives up to its name. Captivating blue-green leaves on eye-catching, vibrantly purple/pink stems and midribs with that classic Lacinato leaf shape plus all the flavor. Vigorous, upright plants with a well-earned reputation for being more winter hardy than other strains of Lacinato. Bred in and for organic conditions by Hank Keogh of Avoca Seed in Corvallis, OR from his inspiration to backcross a ‘Rainbow Lacinato’ variant with its ‘Lacinato’ ancestor. A relatively new variety, it fast emerged as a firm favorite among kale afficionados in the PNW. It's not unusual for kale cultivars developed in the S. Willamette Valley, our homebase ecoregion, to emerge as pillars of the national and international winter cropping scene. The collective efforts of the independent plant breeding community hereabouts have largely been responsible for positioning us as the de facto global center of B. oleraceae and B. napus kale diversity. What does such diversity look like in the field, July 30 and August 25th , 2022.Adaptive6/29/20232021
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeHomesteaders PerennialThe defining perennial kale grex Stateside, just now, developed by the Agrarian Sharing Network's Chris Homanics. He describes this achievement on the Experimental Farm Network website, here, https://store.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/products/kaleidescope-perennial-kale-grex Our seed directly from Chris, of course.ASN6/30/20232021
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeKale CoalitionThe definitive European Kale grex, Stateside, created by Adaptive Seeds from a mix of 17 oleracea kales and their crosses, born of material they collected during a 2007 Seed Ambassadors trip throughout Western and Eastern Europe. An original combination of Hoj Amager Grunkohl (DK), Madeley (UK), Westphalian (UK), Westland Winter (UK), Westländer Winter (DE), Asparagus Kale (IR, UK), 1,000 Headed kale (DE), Roter Krauskohl (DE), Altmarker Braun (DE), Baltic Red (SE), Blonde Butter of Jalhay (BE), Butterkohl (DE), Nicki’s Cut’N’Come Again (IE), Shetland (UK), Hellerbutter Kohl (CH), Cavolo Nero di Toscana (IT), and Ostfriesische Palm (CH), the grex has been actively stewarded by Adaptive Seeds for some 15 years now. Diversity, vigor, maturity spread, productivity, hardiness, it has it all. A backbone Brassica population central to resilient winter cropping in the PNW. Find video monographs of this population here and here .Adaptive6/21/20232023
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeLacinato RainboxFrom a cross of Lacinato Redbor hybrid kale Frank Morton at Wild Garden Seeds selected this diverse population that includes the leaf qualities that Lacinato is loved for, overlain with hues of red, purple, and blue-green. Large, magestic, upright plants, more vigorous and cold hardy than Lacinato. Some plants will perennialize in the Pacific Northwest. A key cultivar emerging out of independent plant breeding movement in the PNW.Wild Garden Seeds6/22/20232022
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeMadeleyAn extremely vigorous flat leaf, heirloom green kale from England. Hardy, tender and sweet, this kale out-produces most other kales through the winter as well. Multiple growth tips produce plentiful sprouting kale raab in spring to fill the hunger gap. Related to Thousand Headed kale. Given to The Seed Ambassadors Project by the Heritage Seed Library in England. Our seed from Adaptive in Brownsville, OR.Adaptive6/24/20232023
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeScarletA reliable red ruffled kale. Just a little shorter than the universal Redbor F1 hybrid in height, slightly less crinkled leaf, and with deep rose color merging with purple. Striking color. Variable. Will respond quickly to selection.Fedco6/27/20232016
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeWild DreamsA relatively stable, new broad-leafed winter kale bred by Jennifer Williams of Wild Dreams Farm on Vashon Island, Washington, working alongside Ryan Wheeler, a member of the Vashon Seed Growers Network that began with a diverse mix of kale from Wild Garden Seeds in Oregon. Jen describes it: "This kale what started off my seed love and plant breeding experiments! From a wonderfully fun kale breeding project about six years ago with Ryan Wheeler this variety emerged from many different winter kales that cross pollinated for three seasons in a row until the genetics mostly settled on this leaf shape and color. This kale grows best as a winter kale as it gets sweet and bounces back after a frost, holds well through the soggy winter months to emerge strong in the spring with new growth and abundant florets for seed production and snacking. This kale has naturalized at Wild Dreams Farm and pops up everywhere, producing a marketable crop that I do nothing to start."EFN6/23/20232023
KohlrabiB. oleraceaeSuperschmelzGerman heirloom reaches epic, 8"-10" diameter remaining tender and buttery in texture, weighing up to 10 pounds. Flesh is supple and never gets fibrous. Surprisingly hardy.Adaptive6/16/20232020
Parsley leafPetroselinum crispumEinfache Schnitt 3Flavorful and hardy, dark green, flat leaves grow upright allowing for easy harvest and built-in rot resistance, even in the dead of winter. Seed from Adaptive, originally sourced from Bingenheimer Saatgut, the German biodynamic seed company.Adaptive6/16/2023202190%
CeleriacApium graveolensGiant PragueThis variety, introduced in 1871. Vulnerable to freezes, this crop should be lifted prior to the first heavy frost, and vernalized in storage, then replanted in the spring. A cold garage or shed that doesn't freeze, ideal. This approach allows for the crop to be grown to its full size before storing. Contact us for further details.Baker Creek6/15/20232021
Celery leafApium graveolensHollow Pipe of MalinesTypical seed-saving literature affirms that A. graveolens succumbs to freezes but this cultivar, much hardier than traditional stalk celeries, not only readily winters the harshest winter weather in the field but positively thrives through PNW winters. A relatively new introduction to the PNW overwintered diet, it has quickly established itself as a hardy, winter dietary essential. Yet another classic example of how dietary trends respond to proven resilience in food crops. What it is to truly go local. Excellent candidate for local variety maintenance off, say, 10 plants. Seed is tiny, so a relatively few amount of plants produce simply vast amounts.Vistara, orig. Adaptive6/15/20232022
Celery leafApium graveolensWhite QueenChinese variety with a strong flavor that is used more as an herb than a vegetable. Perfect for Chinese food recipes that include both stems and leaves. Strong flavors are a great addition to stir fry, soups, and Thai dishes that call for celery leaf. The unique white stems, captivating. Not as hardly as Hollow Pipe of Malines. Perhaps best overwintered in a greenhouse. Excellent candidate for local variety maintenance off, say, 10 plants.Adaptive6/15/20232020
Brussels SproutsB. oleraceaeCatskills90 days. Dwarf variety. Loss of OP diversity in Brussels sprouts, perhaps the hardiest winter Brassica crop type in the face of both snow and cold, have been catastrophic. They require no special winter care.Everwilde6/15/2023202390% 2022
Brussels SproutsB. oleraceaeLong Island Improved100 days. Semi-dwarf. Can set 50-100 sprouts on a plant. The standard open-pollinated American variety since the 1890s. Until the recent development of hybrids, Long Island Improved Brussels Sprouts was the chief commercial variety. Loss of OP diversity in Brussels sprouts, perhaps the hardiest winter Brassica crop type in the face of both snow and cold, have been catastrophic. They require no special winter care.Everwilde6/15/2023202385% 2022
CabbageB. oleraceaeBrunswickOur first season with this large, drumhead, German heirloom variety. Wide, flattened heads weigh 6-9 pounds and are great for making sauerkraut. Seed is very fresh and leapt out of the flats. We are told this cabbage is very cold hardy, and stores well. In Continental Europe, the cabbage is traditionally dug, storing excellently for eating or replanting. Ideally, we'd dig and store in a cold space – drumhead cabbages tend to be more susceptible to heavy winter weather – above freezing, then replant for seed. But we're experimenting. Overwinter in the field, dig for replanting, or both? What do we have resources for? Typically, for seed-saving, professionals seed cabbage (especially the fall-maturing types) later in the season, so that plants go through the winter without fully formed heads and therefore have a much greater likelihood of survival in the face of harsh winter conditions. They will flower and set seed in the new year regardless. But for seedsaving at the homestead level, we like folk to be able to eat their 'rogues' – the plants they select out or 'cull' as off-types. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthEverwilde6/17/2023202390%
CabbageB. oleraceaeSapporo Giant #4We are growing this for the first time. We know little of this giant cabbage, once a premier crop in Hokkaido, the northern island of Japan. Noted as a unique variety since the 1800’s, it was almost lost to history. Hokkaido growers report averages of 17-37 pounds each, or even up to 44 pounds in optimal growing conditions. We understand "it can withstand the harsh wind, snow and low temperatures, and even when the outer cabbage leaves are frozen, the inner edible portion can stay intact and edible." We have no record of it being grown in the PNW. More cultural and culinary details here . Typically, for seed-saving, professionals seed cabbage (especially the fall-maturing types) later in the season, so that plants go through the winter without fully formed heads and therefore have a much greater likelihood of survival in the face of harsh winter conditions. They will flower and set seed in the new year regardless. But for seedsaving at the homestead level, we like folk to be able to eat their 'rogues' – the plants they select out or 'cull' as off-types. "Growing cabbage for seed is one of the most interesting seed saving experiences. In early of the new year, cut a shallow "X" in the top of the head. This will allow the emerging seed stalk to push up through the cabbage a bit more easily. The seed stalk actually pushes the head open and uncurls itself as it rises out of the head. it is a vegetable birth in the most graphic sense. The stalk will grow 3"-4" tall before branching out." – Suzanne AshworthBaker Creek6/17/20232023
CauliflowerB. oleraceaeBroccoli di Bassana (Tardivo)200 days. Overwintering cauliflower for spring harvest. Seed is from Italy but is being offered by Uprising Seeds, WA, the independent seed company emerging as the USA's foremost OP winter cauliflower powerhouse. A unique heritage Italian cauliflower with cream to light green petite heads (~300g) with tight wrapper leaves. Cultivated for centuries in the area of Bassano del Grappa, situated up against the Tyrolean foothills of the northwest Veneto region.Uprising7/1/20232023
CauliflowerB. oleraceaeBroccolo di Bassano (Il Bonorivo)130 days. Winter cauliflower for late November through end of the year. Seed is from Italy but is being offered by Uprising Seeds, WA, the independent seed company emerging as the USA's foremost OP winter cauliflower powerhouse. A unique heritage Italian cauliflower with cream to light green petite heads (~300g) with tight wrapper leaves. Cultivated for centuries in the area of Bassano del Grappa, situated up against the Tyrolean foothills of the northwest Veneto region.Uprising6/17/2023202398%
CauliflowerB. oleraceaeNash's All Year RoundNash Huber — “I’ve been taking care of this plant for almost 50 years, from Forest Shomer of Abundant Life Seed Foundation. Our All Year Round Cauliflower is a winter cauliflower. Planted in July and August the plant over winters and will produce beautiful heads of great Cauliflower in April. The plants will become large in the spring and will cover the heads with good wrapping leaves to keep the heads white and protected from late frost. Direct seed in July and transplant in August. I have used this cauli in same year production. By that I mean, planted it early summer and got a crop of nice cauli. in the fall. However I have done quite a bit of selection over the years, and that work has been to pull out the over wintering hardiness and spring production and that selection has probably moved the plant away from same season heading. But I not sure of that last reasoning, the plant may still have good same season heading.” Restoration Seeds packet claims the variety can be fall harvested. Uprising says vernalization is necessary. So we seeded their seed two weeks apart.Restoration Seeds6/17/20232023
CauliflowerB. oleraceaeNash's All Year RoundNash Huber — “I’ve been taking care of this plant for almost 50 years, from Forest Shomer of Abundant Life Seed Foundation. Our All Year Round Cauliflower is a winter cauliflower. Planted in July and August the plant over winters and will produce beautiful heads of great Cauliflower in April. The plants will become large in the spring and will cover the heads with good wrapping leaves to keep the heads white and protected from late frost. Direct seed in July and transplant in August. I have used this cauli in same year production. By that I mean, planted it early summer and got a crop of nice cauli. in the fall. However I have done quite a bit of selection over the years, and that work has been to pull out the over wintering hardiness and spring production and that selection has probably moved the plant away from same season heading. But I not sure of that last reasoning, the plant may still have good same season heading.” Restoration Seeds packet claims the variety can be fall harvested. Uprising says vernalization is necessary. So we seeded their seed two weeks apart.Uprising7/1/20232023
CollardB. oleraceaeGeorgia Collards80 days. aka Georgia Southern, Creole, Southern. Historic collard first released around 1880. The Southern Willamette Valley is the de facto heartland of global B. oleraceae and B. napus kale diversity but we know little about collard diversity. This year we are making a major bioregional push push into exploring what has traditionally been a highly heat _and_ cold resistant crop. Be part of this common adventure.Everwllde6/17/2023202390%
CollardB. oleraceaeVariegated Collards80 days. Our current exploration of Collard diversity includes this Southern heirloom, seed originally via SESE grower Walt Childs. Introduced 1999 by SESE.] Tender greens with good cold hardiness; as the plants experience colder and colder weather, at least half the plants’ leaves become a beautiful green-and-white during the winter. In the South where the winter temperatures remain above 20°F, plants can live 5+ years and develop stems 3" in diameter.Southern Exposure6/17/2023202381%
CollardB. oleraceaeVates CollardsThe Southern Willamette Valley is the de facto heartland of global B. oleraceae and B. napus kale diversity but we know little about collard diversity. This year we are making a major bioregional push push into exploring what has traditionally been a highly heat _and_ cold resistant crop. Be part of this common adventure. This Vates accession from the Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.Southern Exposure6/17/2023202381%
CollardB. oleraceaeVates CollardsThe Southern Willamette Valley is the de facto heartland of global B. oleraceae and B. napus kale diversity but we know little about collard diversity. This year we are making a major bioregional push push into exploring what has traditionally been a highly heat _and_ cold resistant crop. Be part of this common adventure. This Vates accession from Eden Brothers.Eden Brothers6/17/2023202385%
CollardB. oleraceaeWhaley's FavortieAn old timey variety. Flavor is milder than most collards. Known for making an excellent collard kraut. The Southern Willamette Valley is the de facto heartland of global B. oleraceae and B. napus kale diversity but we know little about collard diversity. This year we are making a major bioregional push push into exploring what has traditionally been a highly heat _and_ cold resistant crop. Be part of this common adventure.Southern Exposure6/17/2023202383%%
CollardB. oleraceaeYellow Cabbage75 days. [NC heirloom, seedstock from Benny and Vickie Cox, owners of the famous Collard Shack in Ayden, NC. Introduced 2015 by SESE.] Milder and more tender than most collards, the yellow-tinted leaves form a loose head. Seed for cabbage collards is hard to come by. This seed from SESE.Southern Exposure6/17/2023202383%%
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeWalking StickAlso known as Tall Jacks, Jersey Cabbage or Cow Cabbage, this extra-tall forage kale is said to grow up to 20 feet in its native range, with an average of 6-12 feet in home gardens. Grown in Europe for centuries, mostly on the island of Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands, where its long sturdy stalks were varnished and turned into canes. Though considered excellent forage for animals, the most tender, young greens are reserved for table use. We haven't grown it before. We're curious how it will do.Baker Creek6/28/20232021
Kale – EuropeanB. oleraceaeYakima Forage KaleOregon farmer and friend Henry Storch noticed this naturalized kale on a beekeeping adventure some years back, went back to it to collect seed, told us the story, and promised to get us some once he'd grown it out. He passed the results along to us at a propagation fair this spring. Henry's a farming professional. We're very curious why this population caught his eye and he saw fit to bring it into the domesticated mix.Henry Storch6/26/20232021100%
KohlrabiB. oleraceaeEarly Purple ViennaEarly Purple Vienna' kohlrabi is a pre-1860 heirloom home garden and market variety. Winter hardy.Baker Creek6/16/20232021
BeetBeta vulgarisThree Root Grex #130 year interbreeding mix of gold, pink & purple heirlooms. Peace Seeds, Corvallis, OR, original.Peace Seedlings7/9/2023?
BeetBeta vulgarisThree Root Grex #230 year interbreeding mix of gold, pink & purple heirlooms. Peace Seeds original.30 year interbreeding mix of gold, pink & purple heirlooms. Peace Seeds, Corvallis, OR, original.Peace Seedlings7/9/2023?
Parsley rootPetroselinum crispumHamburg RootedHeirloom dual-use parsley produces fleshy parsnip-like roots up to 10 inches long that are cooked as a vegetable. Dark green leaves may be used like ordinary parsley.Baker Creek6/16/20232021
Parsley rootPetroselinum crispumHilmarPure white, 8” long carrot-shaped root vegetable with a mild parsley flavor. Very aromatic and great in soups or roasted in the oven. Very cold hardy. Edible leaves. Very viglrous. Big strong tops compete successfully with weeds, make for easy harvest and are nice for bunching.Adaptive6/16/2023202191%